Volume 5, Issue 1, March 2019, Page: 7-13
Versatility of RNA-Binding Proteins in Living Cells
Riki Kurokawa, Division of Gene Structure and Function, Research Center for Genomic Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Hidaka, Japan
Akihide Takeuchi, Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
Nobuyuki Shiina, Laboratory of Neuronal Cell Biology, National Institute for Basic Biology, Okazaki, Japan; Exploratory Research Center on Life and Living Systems, Okazaki, Japan; Department of Basic Biology, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Okazaki, Japan
Masato Katahira, Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan; Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
Takefumi Yamashita, Laboratory for Systems Biology and Medicine, Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, the University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
Yoko Matsuno, Division of Clinical Preventive Medicine, Niigata University, Niigata, Japan
Keisuke Hitachi, Division for Therapies Against Intractable Diseases, Institute for Comprehensive Medical Science, Fujita Health University, Toyoake, Japan
Shinsuke Ishigaki, Research Division of Dementia and Neurodegenerative Disease, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan; Brain and Mind Research Center, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan; Department of Neurology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan
Nesreen Haamad, Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan; Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
Ryoma Yoneda, Division of Gene Structure and Function, Research Center for Genomic Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Hidaka, Japan
Naomi Ueda, Division of Gene Structure and Function, Research Center for Genomic Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Hidaka, Japan
Kei Iida, Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
Motoyasu Hosokawa, Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
Masatoshi Hagiwara, Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
Mamiko Iida, Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan; Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
Tsukasa Mashima, Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan; Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
Yudai Yamaoki, Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
Masatomo So, Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan
Takashi Nagata, Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan; Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
Gen Sobue, Research Division of Dementia and Neurodegenerative Disease, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan; Brain and Mind Research Center, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan
Keiko Kondo, Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
Hiroki Watanabe, Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan
Takayuki Uchihashi, Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan
Received: Jul. 23, 2019;       Accepted: Aug. 14, 2019;       Published: Aug. 29, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.bs.20190501.12      View  26      Downloads  17
Abstract
This conference paper aims at demonstration of complexity or multiplicity of RNA-binding protein (RBP) and its related RNA. The data in the manuscript are based upon the third Annual Meeting of the RNA study group, held at the Tokyo office of the Kyoto University on May 23 in 2019. The purpose of the meeting is to present recent progress of the study group and have discussion regarding RNA and related molecules, especially focusing on RBP in this year. We had fourteen sessions and documented ten of them in the manuscript. There were exciting and fruitful debates. Actual presentations are shown as follows. Specific RBP Sfpq and Qk are involved in neuronal development in mouse system. Also in mouse, liquid- and solid-like RNA granule formation plays pivotal roles in neuronal functions. Biochemical experiments demonstrate that affinity profiles categorize RNA-Binding proteins into distinctive groups. This presents basis for biological divergence of RBPs. In the context of pathology, RNA aptamers against prion and Alzheimer’s diseases may present therapeutic outcome. Computational analysis is another utility for approaching riddle of RBPs. The study of X-chromosome inactivation is pioneering field of long noncoding RNAs. Redundant triplex interactions between lncRNA and LINE-1s are supposed to be crucial in X-chromosome inactivation. Myogenesis-related lncRNA, Myoparr promotes skeletal muscle atrophy caused by denervation through the regulation of GDF5/BMP14 expression. In neurodegenerative disorders functional loss of TLS/FUS induces onset of frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Conformational change of TLS is induced with binding of various nucleic acid molecules. TLS is also involved in phase separation into aggregation to pathogen generation of neurodegenerative diseases. The meeting has been successfully prorogued. We utilize the data to boost the activity of the field of RNA and RBP. The achievements of the meeting have confirmed pivotal roles of RBPs in living cells. It should be in complexity. We will be able to analyze intricate phenomena of RBP biological actions and contribute to uncover the veiled rules in divergent biological programs.
Keywords
RNA-Binding Protein, Long Noncoding RNA, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, TLS FUS, X Chromosome Inactivation, Phase Separation, Neuron, Computer Simulation
To cite this article
Riki Kurokawa, Akihide Takeuchi, Nobuyuki Shiina, Masato Katahira, Takefumi Yamashita, Yoko Matsuno, Keisuke Hitachi, Shinsuke Ishigaki, Nesreen Haamad, Ryoma Yoneda, Naomi Ueda, Kei Iida, Motoyasu Hosokawa, Masatoshi Hagiwara, Mamiko Iida, Tsukasa Mashima, Yudai Yamaoki, Masatomo So, Takashi Nagata, Gen Sobue, Keiko Kondo, Hiroki Watanabe, Takayuki Uchihashi, Versatility of RNA-Binding Proteins in Living Cells, Biomedical Sciences. Vol. 5, No. 1, 2019, pp. 7-13. doi: 10.11648/j.bs.20190501.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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